Law and order breaking down in Philippines: UN investigator

A top United Nations’ human rights investigator has warned that Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte’s war on drugs would only unleash more problems including rampant killings, vigilante crimes and an overall breakdown in law and order.

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“The war on drugs does not work,” Agnes Callamard, the UN’s special rapporteur on extrajudicial killings, told a human rights conference in Manila.

“Badly thought-out, ill-conceived drug policies not only fail to address substantively drug dependency, drug-related criminality and the drug trade, they add more problems, as has been well documented around the world,” she said.

The comments came after US President Donald Trump provoked an avalanche of criticism for inviting Mr Duterte, a foul-mouthed firebrand former provincial mayor, to the White House, and praised his efforts to rid the country of drugs.

Two US legislators on Friday introduced legislation in the US Senate seeking to restrict the exportation of arms by the US to the Philippines, as the death toll under the crackdown almost reaches 8000, including children as young as five.

Republican Senator Marco Rubio, chairman of the US foreign relations sub-committee, said the war on drugs is “deeply alarming”.

“This is not the right way to conduct an anti-drug campaign, and our legislation reflects our sincere desire to work with the Philippines to support human rights, expose narcotics networks emanating from mainland China and other countries, and use a public health approach to responsibly counter the danger drugs pose to our society,” he said.

Mr Duterte’s officials scoffed at the bill which would require the US State Department to report on the human rights situation in the Philippines before it could be passed.

“We have plenty of arms,” said the President’s chief legal counsel Salvador Panelo.

In his latest comments, Mr Duterte declared it will take him three years to stabilise the Philippines which has one of Asia’s highest rates of drug use.

He promised to step-up the drugs war and efforts to curb criminality and corruption.

Ms Callamard’s comments angered Mr Duterte, whose spokesman Ernesto Abella said she had failed to notify the government of her visit to Manila in a “clear signal” she was not interested in an objective view.

But Ms Callamard said she had informed Manila of her trip in advance and was participating in an academic human rights forum in her private capacity.

She praised Filipinos who have spoken out against the killings.

“I have followed the testimonies of the relatives of victims, I have seen the brave work of civil society actors, lawyers, human rights defenders, academics, senators,” she said.

Mr Duterte was elected promising to wipe out illegal drugs within months, declaring among other outlandish statements that fish in Manila Bay would grow fat from the bodies of drug users and pushers.

A complaint has been filed in the International Criminal Court at The Hague citing Mr Duterte and 11 of his officials for crimes against humanity.

The court has yet to decide if it would accept the case.

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It’s bonds to the rescue as the needle points up for interest rates

With interest rates heading higher and the global economy resuming a growth trajectory, it’s clear the investment landscape is changing and your investment portfolio may also have to adapt to the new reality.

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Younger investors may never have made decisions in the environment we are heading into, as it’s the first time in more than a decade that the needle has pointed up for interest rates.

And that raises the question, in a rising interest rate environment, whether there is any reason to buy bonds.

The answer is yes, and the reason is that bonds should always have a role in a diversified portfolio.

In general, bonds provide income, protect capital and provide diversification.

However, what may be adjusted is the type of bond exposure held. There are many types of bonds, including treasury bonds, investment grade corporate bonds, high-yield bonds and mortgage-backed bonds, just to name some of the common ones.

Finding out what bond suits your risk appetite requires some advice and homework, and it’s worth taking your time to make sure you get products that meet your portfolio needs.

But perhaps not as well known is that investors can also tilt bond exposures towards sectors that benefit from a rising interest rate environment. For example, the financial sector – banks, insurers, brokers – typically becomes more profitable as interest rates rise, so their bond issues often perform relatively well against this backdrop.

It is also worth noting that a rising interest environment is not necessarily bad for investment returns.

The chart above shows Australian investment returns during past US Federal Reserve tightening cycles. Over these cycles, Australian corporate bonds have delivered an average return of 7.8 per cent.

But bonds are just one of the investments in a portfolio that may need adjusting as we head into a new world.

It is the returning strength of the global economy as it pivots to growth that is pushing interest rates higher.

And it is the US that’s leading the charge with strong domestic demand and rising employment. While there is still some uncertainty surrounding President Donald Trump’s fiscal policies, the US economy is forecast to grow modestly above trend over the next two years.

And against a backdrop of solid growth and rising price pressures, the Federal Reserve has started to normalise interest rates.

It’s a different scenario in Australia, where there is still a lower-for-longer outlook on interest rates, being driven by constrained consumer spending and stubbornly high unemployment.

And this discrepancy between the Fed and the RBA on interest rates creates some interesting opportunities for Australian investors.

Rising US rates will send investment flows into the US and away from Australia if it stays on hold. That will place downward pressure on the Aussie dollar and strengthen the US dollar.

And so, if you agree with the scenario, it may make sense to increase exposure to US dollar investments.

Also, if growth and interest rates are higher in the US, then US dollar investments might offer a higher return than those in Australia for a comparable level of risk.

The key takeaway is it’s time to open your investment portfolio, and make sure its content suits the prevailing economic environment.

Danica Hampton is head of investment specialists at Citi Wealth

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Australia crushes New Zealand 30-12 in final Anzac Test

Australia crushes New Zealand 30-12 in final Anzac Test Josh Dugan of Australia celebrates scoring a try during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

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Referee Matt Cecchin gestures during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images)

Kanagroos supporters cheer during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images)

Australians celebrate winning the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

Valentine Holmes of Australia fails to ground the ball properly during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

Man of the match Matt Gillett of Australia is pictured with his daughter during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

The Kiwis perform the Haka during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images)

Team mates celebrate the try of Jake Trbojevic of Australia during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

Josh Dugan, Tyson Frizell and Johnathan Thurston of the Kangaroos celebrate Tyson Frizell scoring a try as Roger Tuivasa-Sheck of the Kiwis looks dejected during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images)

An area of chairs is set aside as a tribute to domestic violence against women during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

The Kiwis perform the Haka before kick-off in the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images)

Adam Blair of the Kiwis is tackled during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

Adam Blair of the Kiwis is tackled during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

Team mates celebrate the try of Jake Trbojevic of Australia during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

Kangaroos coach Mal Meninga congratulates man of the match Matt Gillett after the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

The Kiwis perform the Haka before kick-off in the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images)

The Kangaroos celebrate with the trophy after victory during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images)

Australians celebrate winning the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

Australians celebrate winning the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

Jake Trbojevic of Australia scores a try during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

Australians celebrate winning the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

Kodi Nikorima of the Kiwis in action during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

James Maloney watches on from the sideline during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images)

Andrew Fifita of Australia is tackled during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

Martin Taupau of the Kiwis looks dejected after a Kangaroos try during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images)

Simon Mannering of the Kiwis looks dejected after a Kangaroos try during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images)

Boyd Cordner of Australia is tackled during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

Andrew Fifita of Australia celebrates a try that was later disallowed during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

Jesse Bromwich of the Kiwis runs out to the field before the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images)

Sam Thaiday of Australia in action during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

Dean Whare of the Kiwis makes a line break during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

Dean Whare of the Kiwis makes a line break during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

Johnathan Thurston of Australia passes during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

Kodi Nikorima of the Kiwis watches on during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images)

Kodi Nikorima of the Kiwis watches on during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images)

Josh Dugan of the Kangaroos receives attention for an injury during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images)

Josh Dugan of the Kangaroos receives attention for an injury during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images)

Josh Dugan of the Kangaroos receives attention for an injury during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images)

Andrew Fifita of the Kangaroos is tackled by Simon Mannering of the Kiwis during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images)

Simon Mannering of the Kiwis is tackled during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

Simon Mannering of the Kiwis in action during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

Jordan Rapana of the Kiwis looks dejected after havign a try disallowed during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images)

Kieran Foran of the Kiwis in action during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

Kieran Foran of the Kiwis in action during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

Tyson Frizell of the Kangaroos celebrates scoring a try as Roger Tuivasa-Sheck of the Kiwis looks dejected during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images)

Tyson Frizell of the Kangaroos celebrates scoring a try as Roger Tuivasa-Sheck of the Kiwis looks dejected during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images)

Dallin Watene-Zelezniak of the Kiwis walks out before the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

Trent Merrin of Australia runs the ball during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Nolan/Getty Images)

Johnathan Thurston and Will Chambers of the Kangaroos celebrate Will Chambers scoring a try during the ANZAC Test match between the Australian Kangaroos and the New Zealand Kiwis at GIO Stadium on May 5, 2017 in Canberra, Australia. (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images)

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facebookSHAREtwitterTWEETemailwhatsappAustralia have sounded a pre-World Cup warning to rival nations with a comprehensive 30-12 defeat over New Zealand in the final Anzac Test on Friday night.

However the win — on a night skipper Cameron Smith celebrated his 50th Test — was soured by a possible fractured cheekbone to Josh Dugan that could rule him out of State of Origin.

The St George Illawarra star came from the GIO Stadium field midway through the second half after clashing heads with Kiwis prop and clubmate Russell Packer and failed to return.

His injury was the only low point on a dominant night for the world No.1 nation, which raced to a 30-0 lead before taking their foot off the pedal and allowing the Kiwis two consolation tries.

Almost one year after breaking a three-game losing streak against the Kiwis in Newcastle, a crowd of 18,535 watched the home side make it five straight wins against the world No.2.

Johnathan Thurston showed no lingering effects of a calf issue by setting up two tries, while second-rowers Boyd Cordner and Matt Gillett also turned in strong defensive efforts.

Blake Ferguson continued his Four Nations form with a game-high 214 metres.

Up 24-0 at the break, the Kangaroos appeared on their way to a record victory when Jake Trbojevic took a no-look pass from Cooper Cronk soon after resumption.

But the Dugan exit coincided with a mini fightback from the visitors, who scored the final two tries through Simon Mannering and Roger Tuivasa-Sheck.

On a night they fielded arguably their strongest side in recent memory following the anticipated return of Kieran Foran, the Kiwis disappointed.

They have now won just one of their past eight Tests.

Dugan opened the scoring in spectacular fashion when he soared to take Thurston’s cross-field kick, and Ferguson doubled the advantage with a 90-metre intercept soon after.

The visitors twice had opportunities to steal momentum, but Tuivasa-Sheck was held up over the line and Shaun Johnson’s bat-on was ruled forward in the same set.

The failures opened the floodgates in defence, with Will Chambers scooting through untouched following Sam Thaiday’s 30-metre break, and Tyson Frizell completing the four-try halftime lead.

AAP

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Litbits May 6 2017

ACU Poetry Prize

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Entries for the 2017 Australian Catholic University Prize for Poetry are open until July 3, with a $10,000 first prize for poetry with the theme “Joy”. See: acu.edu广州桑拿论坛/poetry-prize.

What’s on

May 6: Moving Beyond 1915 Remembrance – free public launch by Professor Joan Beaumont of 286-page printed book and e-book compiled by Peace Works! at National Archives of Australia, Queen Victoria Terrace. Book launch at 2pm; displays and events 10 am to 4 pm; complimentary refreshments all day.

May 6: Come for afternoon tea with Jenevieve Chang, author of The Good Girl of Chinatown: From suburban Sydney to Shanghai Show Girl at 2pm at Asia Bookroom, Lawry Place, Macquarie. RSVP to 62515191. Entry by gold coin donation to the Australian Childhood Foundation. See:AsiaBookroom广州桑拿.

May 7: Join Roanna Gonsalves in conversation about her debut book of short stories The Permanent Resident with Feminartsy’s Zoya Patel at Muse Canberra. Tickets: $10 (includes a drink) or $30 (includes a drink and a copy of the book). musecanberra广州桑拿广州桑拿论坛.

May 8: At 6.30pm, Manning Clark Lecture Theatre 2, ANU, in an ANU/Canberra Times meet the author event, Co-founder and creative director of the Mama Mia Women’s Network, Mia Freedman, will be in conversation with Genevieve Jacobs on Freedman’s new book: Work, Strife, Balance. Free event. Bookings at anu.edu广州桑拿论坛/events or 6125 4144. Book signings at 6pm.

May 8: At Smith’s Alternative Bookstore at 7pm, Owen Bullock will launch Eggshell Sky, a book of haiku by Hazel Hall in collaboration with Angela Hillier, Narelle Jones and Painting with Parkinson’s. Host: Josh Inman. All welcome.

May 10: The next Poetry at the House reading is at University House at 7.30 pm. It will feature Louise Nicholas (from Adelaide), Paul Cliff (from Canberra) and Victoria McGrath (from Yass). Admission: $10 waged, $5 unwaged. RSVP: [email protected]net广州桑拿论坛.

May 11: Still touching hearts: an evening with May Gibbs for the National Centre for Australian Children’s Literature. Includes a presentation of original artwork to the Centre by Jane Brummitt, co-author of May Gibbs More than a Fairy Tale. 5.30-7pm at ALIA House, 9-11 Napier Close Deakin. $15 ($12 for CBCA members). RSVP by May 9: [email protected]广州桑拿.

May 11: In The Unknown Judith Wright Professor Tom Griffiths and Dr Georgina Arnott reflect on the writer’s status as a historian, exploring what can be learnt from her life’s work. National Library of Australia Theatre, Lower Ground 1, 5.30pm, admission free. Bookings: nla.gov广州桑拿论坛.

May 11: Animal Rights Writing is a free panel event with authors Irma Gold, Karen Viggers and Sam Vincent at Tuggeranong Arts Centre at 6pm. tuggeranongarts广州桑拿.

May 13: Plotting Your Novel with Ian McHugh is a writing workshop from 10am to 4pm in the E-Block Seminar Room, Gorman Arts Centre. Cost: $145 members, $210 non-members (includes 12-month membership). Concession rates available. Bookings: bit.ly/ianmchugh.

May 17: John Blay will launch Paula Keogh’s memoir The Green Bell, a portrait of the last year of the poet Michael Dransfield, at Muse Canberra at 5.30 for 6pm. Free admission. RSVP to [email protected]广州桑拿.

May 20: The Little Red Writing Workshop with Mark Tredinnick, a crash course in style, is on from 10am to 4pm in E-Block Seminar Room, Gorman Arts Centre. Cost: $145 members, $210 non-members (includes 12-month membership). Concession rates available. http://bit.ly/marktredinnick.

May 29: At 6pm at the Copland Lecture Theatre, ANU in an ANU/ Canberra Times meet the author event, Robert Dessaix will be in conversation with Professor Nicholas Brown on Dessaix’s new book, The Pleasures of Leisure. Free event. Bookings at anu.edu广州桑拿论坛/events or 6125 4144. Book signings at 5.30pm. .

May 30: At 6.30pm in the Copland Lecture Theatre, ANU in an ANU/Canberra Times meet the author event, Chloe Shorten will be in conversation with Anna-Maria Arabia on Shorten’s new book, Take Heart: A Story for Modern Stepfamilies. Free event. Bookings at anu.edu广州桑拿论坛/events or 6125 4144. Book signings at 6pm.

* Contributions to Litbits are welcome. Please email [email protected]广州桑拿广州桑拿论坛 by COB on the Monday prior to publication. Publication is not guaranteed.

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What is the quintessential Canberran suburb?

NewsFranklin the dog with Barbara Howell of Bonner who has built trust with the homeless dog. 23 Jan 2015Photo: Rohan ThomsonThe Canberra Times Photo: Rohan ThomsonGungahlin region leads house price growth across CanberraCanberra’s light rail could drive up property values along tram lineCanberra’s median house price surpasses $700,000 for first time

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A four-bedroom, two-bathroom house in Franklin could be the quintessential Canberra home.

The Gungahlin suburb’s median price has climbed above the $700,000 mark, on par with the Canberra-wide median of $705,059.

Domain Group data shows that the median house price in Franklin, in the six months to March, was $707,500.

A four-bedroom house at 11 Aldous Street in Franklin sold for close to that amount in September.

The $709,000-home was set on a 495-square-metre block, had two living areas, an en suite to the master bedroom and a double garage. It last exchanged in 2009 for $530,000.

Watson and the suburb of Gungahlin also had a median price comparable with the Canberra-wide figure at $700,000 and $697,500, respectively.

Canberra’s suburban medians ranged from $435,000 in Charnwood to $1,637,500 in Yarralumla.

Domain chief economist Andrew Wilson said Canberra was a compressed market compared to other capital cities.

Sydney, for example, recorded suburban medians ranging from $468,500 in Wilmot to $4,975,000 in Longueville.

“Canberra is a market that does revolve around the centre,” Dr Wilson said.

“There’s not a lot of budget or prestige suburbs and the peak of demand is in the middle.”

Four in five Canberra suburbs had a median house price within $200,000 of the city median.

Domain Group data scientist Nicola Powell said the “average Canberra suburb” had shifted over the past five years.

“Because we’ve had such strong prices growth, what that has meant is perhaps your average, everyday Canberra house is starting to be pushed out onto the outer ring,” Dr Powell says.

“If you rewound to five years ago, it may have been located nearer to the city and maybe in the southern region.

“It reflects that a higher proportion of buyers are priced out of the inner north and inner south area.”

Franklin and Watson are among the suburbs that have experienced a spike in their median property price, in line with the progress of the light rail project.

Further growth is expected along the transport corridor as the project nears completion.

“Infrastructure becomes more important as Canberra spreads,” Dr Wilson said.

“[The light rail] an absolute positive for what is a city that is now not just broadening, but densifying as well.”

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Two children killed in horror Newell Highway crash

Two children killed in horror Newell Highway crash Traffic blocked at the scene of a fatal accident on the Newell Highway north of Dubbo. Photo: BELINDA SOOLE

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Traffic blocked at the scene of a fatal accident on the Newell Highway north of Dubbo. Photo: BELINDA SOOLE

Traffic blocked at the scene of a fatal accident on the Newell Highway north of Dubbo. Photo: BELINDA SOOLE

Traffic blocked at the scene of a fatal accident on the Newell Highway north of Dubbo. Photo: BELINDA SOOLE

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facebookSHAREtwitterTWEETemailwhatsappcommentCommentsTwo children are dead and one has internal injuries after a shocking crash near Dubbo in the early hours of Saturday morning.

Emergency services were called to the crash site on the Newell Highway, approximately 12 kilometres north of Dubbo, about 3.30am after a 4WD and a B-double truck collided.

Officers from Orana Local Area Command attended and established a crime scene, while traffic along the highway was blocked in both directions.

Five people were travelling in the 4WD with two boys, a 12-year-old and a 9-year-old, found dead at the scene.

An adult male and female from the vehicle were treated at the scene for minor injuries but not conveyed to hospital.

A third child, a 5-year-old boy with internal injuries, was airlifted to Westmead Children’s Hospital in a serious condition.

The male truck driver and only occupant of that vehicle was treated at the scene for serious injuries and was airlifted to hospital.

DUBBO: Newell Highway is closed due to a fatal B-double & car crash about 10 km nth of Dubbo. Diversions. https://t.co/XXXPulQZpPpic.twitter广州桑拿/EME1YJ7Gh6

— Live Traffic NSW (@LiveTrafficNSW) May 5, 2017

Members of the NSW Police Force’s crash investigation unit travelled up from Sydney and are at the scene trying to ascertain the cause of the accident.

Motorists are advised to use an alternate route as the Newell Highway remains closed.

Officers will prepare a report for the Coroner outlining the circumstances surrounding the deaths.

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Photos from across Australia: April 30 to May 6, 2017

The week in pictures: May 6, 2017 NEWCASTLE: A foggy start to May failed to deter surfers. Picture: Dave Anderson

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BENDIGO: Sisters Isabelle Smith and Hannah Smith competed in the Trans-Tasman Oceania Inline Hockey Championships in NZ. Their under-14 junior women team won gold against NZ.

BATHURST: Bathurst RC Model Sports club members Michael Cluderay, Peter Kazanis and club secretary Mitchell Finn with their radio controlled models. Photo: CHRIS SEABROOK

BENDIGO: NDIS Rollout for Loddon celebration. Jordana Sayle with her mother Annette Sayle. Picture: DARREN HOWE

BENDIGO: Band Tusk, which will be appearing at Groovin The Moo. Picture: DARREN HOWE

BENDIGO: Premier Daniel Andrews visits Kaliana School. Picture: DARREN HOWE

BALLARAT: The Lost Ones Basement Bar, owner Tara Poole. Photo: Kate Healy

BENDIGO: Bendigo Health will host a day to celebrate being healthy and active at any age. Judy Foster, Leah Callipari and Mabel Nicholls. Picture: DARREN HOWE

BENDIGO: Premier Daniel Andrews visits Kaliana School. Picture: DARREN HOWE

BALLARAT: The newly redeveloped Marty Busch Reserve in Sebasotpol. Photo: Luke Parker

BENDIGO: Melbourne’s Jessica Viscarde and Ryan Ward enjoy autumn in Bendigo. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

BALLARAT: Japanese Day at St Columbas Primary School. Photo: Kate Healy

BENDIGO: Jeanine Kolasa, whose Glitch exhibition opened on Thursday. Picture: DARREN HOWE

TAREE: Matthew Cloak with Jemma before they take off on the annual Mutts on the Manning fundraising walk for animal welfare. Photo: Janine Watson

BENDIGO: Jida Gulpilil. Ambulance Victoria will launch its first comprehensive plan to engage and partner with the community. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

BENDIGO: American TV show House Hunters is filming in Bendigo. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

NARROMINE: Celebrating 40 years of Garden Club are Sisters Janet Coote, Bona Martin, Beryl Smith, Mary Mowell and Trish Fisher. Photo: CONTRIBUTED

BENDIGO: White Hill Primary School students make shadow sculptures as part of a learning workshop with student-teachers. Picture: DARREN HOWE

NYNGAN: Matilda Bright won best dressed tiny tot at the Anzac Races. Photo: GRACE RYAN

NEWCASTLE: A huge crowd at the Supercars community day.

FORBES: Parkes Shire Council staff member Ben Coultas observing drivers for compliance with seatbelt and mobile phone legislation.

BLAYNEY: Raymond Hawkins is bringing a 55 voice gospel choir, led by Tony Backhouse and featuring singers from New Zealand and Australia, to Millthorpe. Photo: Mark Logan.

ORANGE: English backpacker Daniel Baxter is one of the men who will be running the Freak Out at the Orange Show. Photo: JUDE KEOGH

NEWCASTLE: TK Maxx opens in Kotara. Picture: Marina Neil

MAITLAND: Greta teen Jimmy Jones with his mum, Natalie, beside the accident scene on the New England Highway. Picture: Simone De Peak

LITHGOW: Kasey Mill, Joshua Grant and Ursula Saunders with Shaggy, their prize ram and one of their ewes. Picture: KIRSTY HORTON

BOOROWA: Felicity Corcoran with some of the gear purchased by the Boorowa Hospital Auxiliary last year. The Auxiliary hopes to continue purchasing new equipment this year.

PORT STEPHENS: More than 350 dozen oysters were stolen from Richard Farley’s business on the Karuah River on Saturday in the latest targeted attack on farmers. Picture: Marina Neil.

PORT MACQUARIE: University students Fran Dorczak, Alexis Nicholson and Kerryn McCauley are concerned over proposed fee hikes Photo: Ivan Sajko

OBERON: Oberon RSL Sub Branch president Bill Wilcox and secretary Neville Stapleton are looking to recruit new members.

NEWCASTLE: Knights duo Nathan Ross and Pauli Pauli will make their representative debut against Country on Sunday.

NEWCASTLE: Dr Virginia Turner, with one-year-old daughter, Mabel as the John Hunter Hospital opens its PICU. Picture: Simone De Peak.

LAKE MACQUARIE: Kelvin and Marion Gillespie’s home is one of an untold number in the Hunter damaged by expanding road mix. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

KEMPSEY: Quaden Bayles who has dwarfism with his mother Yarraka Photo: Lachlan Leeming.

GRETA: Greta six-year-old Harry Preece has booked his place in the Australian junior team for a tour of America in July. Picture: Harry Preece Golf_Facebook

DUBBO: Murray Mandel said he wanted to reach out to as many people as possible about Lifeline. Photo: ORLANDER RUMING

DUBBO: Tracy Hanna with the cheque for $10,000 she was given by the organisers of the Titan Macquarie Mud Run. Photo: CONTRIBUTED

CESSNOCK: Paul, Lorraine and Craig Thompson at the ceremony on Tuesday. Picture: Sage Swinton

TAREE: Emergency services help the woman as she remains trapped in the overturned RTV. Photo: NSW Police

PORT STEPHENS: Olympic shooter Michael Diamond leaves court after he was banned from holding a gun licence for 10 years.

MANDURAH: Former Prime Minister Tony Abbott answers question from Mandurah Catholic College Students and gave his opinion on’Gonski 2.0′ education funding plan. Photo: Marta Pascual Juanola.

CESSNOCK: A kangaroo joins the race in the last.

BATHURST: Bathurst Tenpin Bowling’s Dwayne Price, Dan Simms, Pikachu and Zing’s Cassandra Healey are hosting events to help fundraise for the Starlight Foundation. Photo: CHRIS SEABROOK

NYNGAN: The under 25s most fashionable finalists at the Nyngan Anzac Day Races. Photo: GRACE RYAN

NYNGAN: Jade Kirk, Alli Jenkins, Katie Elrick and Emily Morel at the Anzac Races. Photo: GRACE RYAN

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Mum’s the word: Woman, 78, accused of hiring $25k ‘hitman’ ahead of trial

File photo: iStockThe mother of a man accused of themurder of a Whorouly woman allegedly hired a hitman to kill the key witness in his trial.

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But her plan went south when police discovered her alleged plan and posed as the hitman willing to do the job for $25,000.

Michael Cardamone, 50, is due to stand trial in July for the alleged murder of Karen Chetcuti Verbunt in January 2016 – accused of drugging and assaultingher before setting her alight.

Both he and his mother MariaCardamone have been charged withperverting the course of justice and incitement to commit murder.

The 78-year-old applied for bail in Wangaratta Magistrates’ Court on Friday, but was refused on the grounds she was an unacceptable risk to witnesses in the community.

Homicide squad Detective Senior Constable Steven Eppingstall told the court in evidence that police intercepted phone calls between MariaCardamone and her son in jail in March, where they allegedly discussed the need to kill the witness.

An undercover operative posing as a hitman agreed to a price to be paid in two installments of $12,500 before and after the job.

“She was very guarded in the words she used, she often spoke in code and was the instigator of some of these codes,” DetectiveEppingstall said.

He said MariaCardamone hid the arrangement from the rest of the familythen, on March 23, she tried to rip off the “hitman” and paid just$9000.

79yo woman charged with incitement to commit murder has arrived at Wangaratta court with police. @bordermailpic.twitter广州桑拿/d9ivo77YOV

— Shana Morgan (@shana_morgan) May 5, 2017Mrs Cardamone has been willing to go to great extremes to protect her son.

Police prosecutor Sergeant Maio Eliades

Barrister Gordon Chisholm said there was no evidenceMariaCardamone was a threat to any other witnesses and had been banned from calling or visiting her son in jail.

He argued a $25,000 surety from a family member and an order to engage with mental health services would reduce the risk of reoffending.

“The individual witness that Mrs Cardamone is fixated on would be in a different category to other witnesses,” he said. “There is no evidence to say she’s going to move her fixation.

MariaCardamone, a short woman dressed in a dark pink jumper, put her hand to her head and shut her eyes when magistrate David Faram announced he would refuse her bail application because she was an unacceptable risk of reoffending.

“The medical report indicates she has been suffering from depression and has been in an anxious state for sometime,” Mr Faram said.

“This case against her seems to suggest she planned this reasonably well (and she) was, and perhaps remains, fixated on making sure this particular witness is not available to give evidence in the trial.”

MariaCardamone was remanded for a committal mention on August 3. Her son’s trial is due to begin in Wangaratta on July 31.

The Border Mail

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Death cap mushrooms found in Launceston

World’s deadliest mushrooms found near child’s playground TweetFacebookMORE GALLERIES

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facebookSHAREtwitterTWEETemailwhatsappcommentCommentsThe world’s deadliest mushrooms havebeen discovered for the first time growing in Tasmania.

Commonly referred to as “death cap” mushrooms, specimens ofAmanita phalloides were found under an oak tree near the children’s playground at City Park in Launceston.

The deadly mushrooms havebeen sprouting in Victoria and Canberra lately, prompting health warnings, and have also been found in other parts of Australia.

UTAS mycologist Dr Genevieve Gates DEADLY: Amanita phalloides, commonly known as the death cap mushroom, has been discovered at City Park. Picture: Paul Scambler

City of Launceston general manager Robert Dobrzynski said the council had advised parks staff to be on the lookout for this species and to catalogue, report and eradicate them.

“We remind people that they shouldn’t eat anything they are unsure about from parks and reserves, especially mushrooms,” he said.

“This species is commonly found growing near established oak trees, and people with oak trees on their properties may wish to check them.”

A document from the Australian National Botanical Gardens said if people ate the mushrooms, they needed to go to hospital immediately.

“The poisons in one cap are enough to kill a healthy adult and less will be enough to kill a small child.”

The document described young caps as close to hemispherical in shape that flatten as they expand.

“When fully open they are gently curved and smooth. The colour is usually yellowish-green, but may sometimes be olive to light brown.”

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North Newcastle part of league history

TRIUMPH: North Newcastle trio Bec Young, Caitlin Moran and Simone Smith celebrate after the Jillaroos’ 16-4 victory over the Kiwi Ferns in Canberra on Friday. Picture: Getty Images.North Newcastle’s newly formed women’s squad will play part in two significant rugby league moments within the space of 24 hours.

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The squad will haveits first Sydney Women’s Metropolitan Rugby League game at home groundPassmore Oval on Saturday after startrio Bec Young, Caitlin Moran and Simone Smith helped Australia to a 16-4 Test win over New Zealand in Canberra on Friday.

“It is very special,” North Newcastle’s Margaret Watson said.

“The gentlemen who have come back and put in all the effort to re-establish the team have done a great job. And the men’s playershave been great as well. We do team runs against them on Friday night and it’s a shift where the women’s team is an equal part of the club.”

Watson is one of seven North Newcastle players in the NSW Country squad.

The former Australian rugby union representative will be joined by Phoebe Desmond, Jerry Burgmann, Kylie Hilder, Donna Sutton, Amy Broadhead and Alicia Martin in a fixture against City at North Sydney next Sunday (May 14).

North Newcastle, who lost round one 50-12 to the Greenacre Tigers last weekend,tackle theRedfern All Blacks at Passmore Oval on Saturday (3pm).

Young, Moran and Smith aren’t likely toback up for North Newcastle but will play an important role throughout the 2017 campaign.

It is the first time North Newcastle, one of the Hunter region’sfoundation clubs from 1910, have fielded a women’s team.

In recent seasons much of the squad played in the same state tackle competition under the Hunter Stars banner and prior to that with Maitland.

AAP reports: The Australian Jillaroos have avenged last year’s Test loss to the New Zealand Kiwi Ferns with a gritty 16-4 win in Canberra.

The Jillaroos continued their dominance of the Ferns from the Auckland Nines whitewashand turned the tables on last year’s 26-16 loss by winning a bruising Friday’s double header.

Home captain Ruan Sims was named best afield after leading her side’s pack through the middle in a tough encounter.

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